Tapestries – The William Morris collector

Le Comptoir des tissus just released a collector of ten tapestries all woven at or inspired from William Morris factory. They are available at its shop ingame (look at its pics in its profile) or at its MarketPlace.

Tapestries - William Morris collector SL Add

Ehret die frauen - William Morris sEhret die Frauen (512 x 512)

Designed by Pre-Raphaelite artist Marianne Stokes (born Preindisberger) 1855-1927. Woven by John Martin and Gordon Berry, Morris & Co, Merton Abbey in 1912, this tapestry was inspired by a quotation from Schiller’s 1796 poem, ‘Wurde der Frauen’ (Women’s Worth) which appears in the upper border: ‘honour the women, they broid and weave heavenly roses into earthly life’. Below the figures are labelled left to right: Courage, Caring, Love, Wisdom and Fidelity. The original hangs in the Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester.

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Design for Flora - William Morris sThe Roman Goddess of Flowers (512 x 1024)

A pair with Pomona, Flora, The Roman Goddess of Flowers, belongs to those tapestries which featured Edward Burne-Jones’s early figure designs. Incorporating Morris’ decorative details. Flora was woven between 1884 and 1885 at Merton Abbey.

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Tree of life - William Morris sTree of Life (512 x 1024)

The design for this exquisite hand woven wall hanging was taken from William Morris’ bedchamber in Kelmscott Manor. The original bed chamber hangings, which can be seen there today, were actually embroidered by William Morris’ wife, Jane, in 1891. After William Morris, Walthamstow, London 1834-1896. “The Tree of Life” has a complex & colorful pattern of flowing leaves and branches, coming out of a tree. The whole pattern symbolizes the positive flourishing of life and is a recurring theme in all of William’s tapestry works. Even in his wallpaper works, this subject is eminent. ‘Mille Fleurs,’ the ‘Medieval Decorative Technique,’ inspired most of the backgrounds of the artist’s works with heavily decorated backgrounds.

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The Arming and Departure of the Knights - The Holy Grail - William MorrisThe Arming and Departure of the Knights – The Holy Grail (1024 x 512)

The first of six panels from the Holy Grail series, this wall hanging was designed by Sir Edward Burne-Jones and was first woven by Morris & Co. in 1894. The original hangs in the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery. Queen Guinevere and Sir Lancelot are on the left hand side of the tapestry.

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The Round Table - William Morris sThe Round Table (1024 x 512)

This tapestry was designed by Sir Edward Burne-Jones and was first woven by Morris & Co. in 1895/6 and is one of six panels illustrating the story of the Holy Grail. It represents the King Arthur and his knights at the Round Table, amongst which Sir Bors, Sir Percival and Sir Galahad.The original hangs in the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery.

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Verdures with Reindeer and Coats of Arms - William Morris sVerdures with Reindeer and Coats of Arms (1024 x 512)

This tapestry was designed by Sir Edward Burne-Jones and was first woven by Morris & Co. in 1895/6 and is one of six panels illustrating the story of the Holy Grail. It represents the coats of arms of certain knights of the round table: Sirs Gawaine, Lancelot, Hector, Percival, Bors and Galahad.The original hangs in the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery.

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Adoration of the Maji - William Morris sAdoration of the Maji (1024 x 512)

First produced in 1890 for Exeter College, Oxford, the Adoration of the Maji became Morris & Co’s most popular ecclesiastical tapestry. Originally designed by Edward Burne-Jones, specifically for tapestry with background detail by John Henry Dearle, it was considered by William Morris to be one of the company’s most notable achievements.

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Fox & Pheasants - William Morris sFox and Pheasants (1024 x 512)

This was the first tapestry to be designed by John Dearle (1860-1932) who later became Morris & Co’s chief textile designer. Dearle and others worked on the ‘fox & Pheasants’ duringg the Royal Jubilee Exhibition held in Manchester in 1887. The tapestry was finished in 1888 and subsequently bought for the Whitworth Art Gallery in Manchester, where it remains to this day.

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